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Honey

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All I'm looking for is a bit of general advice...like how Hard is it for a noob to Learn beekeeping..?

The start up kit can be quite expensive and I don't want to spend money on something I can't do..or kill a load of bees with my inexperience..:biggrin:
The start up can be expensive, but the maintenance is basically nothing other than sugar for feeding them when they need it. We feed sugar for the first month of getting a new colony to help them get established, and then they get some feeding before the cold sets in and early spring. Just a supplement to keep them thriving.

We started with a top bar hive that we made ourselves http://beginningbeekeeping.com/TopBarHiveBeekeeping.html But our experience was that a new colony does better in a traditional hive. They have to work harder to get the top bar started, so I suggest you start with a box. If you live in a temperate climate they may do fine in a top bar, but ours only have about 5-6 months to get themselves squared away for the winter, and it's just not long enough.

Don't expect to rob the hive the first year. Give them time to thrive and you and your bees will be happy.

Llamas too...:d5:..WOW.....
I can imagine my hubby fainting now if I asked for a llama
We have had ours for about 12 years and they are easy keepers. They eat all the weeds that no one wants, and thrive on it. They are very hearty, but you can loose them to heat stress and meningeal worms. If you live somewhere that gets very hot for extended periods of time you will need to provide them with misting fans, and plenty of shade and minerals.

As far as lovability goes, they are more like cats. You will need to learn all you can about them and respect their space. Many people make the mistake of trying to treat them like cows or horses, and they are nothing like that. They are more like solitary creatures that live in heards. They can be trained, but you will need lots of patience and realistic expectations. I love them and think they are awesome. If you like to go on day hikes they are the best companions and a ton if fun too. I could go on and on, but that is the basic run down.

Do you get insomnia..?

Are you on a lot of prescription meds..?
No and yes.

My score to the above questionnaire is 8. Most of my points came from my lack of half moons on my fingernails.

I will follow your instructions on the PH testing and will start tonight. Thanks
 

Mossy

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We started with a top bar hive that we made ourselves http://beginningbeekeeping.com/TopBarHiveBeekeeping.html But our experience was that a new colony does better in a traditional hive. They have to work harder to get the top bar started, so I suggest you start with a box. If you live in a temperate climate they may do fine in a top bar, but ours only have about 5-6 months to get themselves squared away for the winter, and it's just not long enough.
Cheers...I'll have a look around the web site thanks...:thumbsup:

Don't expect to rob the hive the first year. Give them time to thrive and you and your bees will be happy.
:thumbsup:

As far as lovability goes, they are more like cats. You will need to learn all you can about them and respect their space. Many people make the mistake of trying to treat them like cows or horses, and they are nothing like that. They are more like solitary creatures that live in heards. They can be trained, but you will need lots of patience and realistic expectations. I love them and think they are awesome. If you like to go on day hikes they are the best companions and a ton if fun too. I could go on and on, but that is the basic run down.
We have thought about getting a goat..but it is one more thing to get someone to look after when we have to go to the UK..so we haven't...

No and yes.
Good on the no insomnia..but if you are on a lot of prescription meds you would be better having a word with the Doc..But..lets have a Look at your PH before we go second guessing..

My score to the above questionnaire is 8. Most of my points came from my lack of half moons on my fingernails.
Good..:thumbsup:..no close family history of AID or arthritis/asthma/psoriasis..?
Have you ever been tested for gluten sensitivity/allergies..?
 

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Good..:thumbsup:..no close family history of AID or arthritis/asthma/psoriasis..?
Have you ever been tested for gluten sensitivity/allergies..?
No to both.
Starting checking my PH and I'll let you know.

Goats are a pain to keep! They get out all the time and need constant worming. They are very prone to parasites.

Llamas don't need much in the way of fencing, They are very territorial and will set there own boundries that they will not leave. They also have a bathroom spot that they use which keeps the pasture clean and it's easy to collect manure for gardening. Their poo is very well balanced and I put it strait on my plants. Haven't tried it with cannabis but hope to some day.
 
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