Save Money Use Honey!

  • Good morning everyone! So I spent the day installing and upgrading a new add-on for AFN that effects our vendor and breeder forums. It's the same setup that we are using on High of the Tiger, but we didn't realize it would effect members a bit differently here on how it's been received.

    The major benefit of the add-on is that it allows breeders/vendors a global calendar (that they add their own events to,) a group media gallery, group discussion area, an information/about tab, and a few other goodies that should make the experience overall a better one.

    One major caveat to point out, the new groups (where you see the overlay) unfortuantely *REQUIRE* you to join them in order to post in them. This is done by design of the software (and I understand why,) however it's been requested to see if we can circumvent this somehow. I will inquire to the developer to see if it's an option available or one that can be added to future versions. So to be clear, you MUST JOIN the group to be able to post and reply, even if your existing threads were there before. We apologize for this minor inconvenience but it's a one-time deal and then it's back to business :-)
  • Hey we're testing out our new Raffle/Giveaway software and wanted to invite you all to try it out with us for a chance to win a Smokin' Screws pipe screen!

    This will be for USA-based growers only (to start,) and the only requirements are 25 minimum post count to put in an entry (which you can do once per hour!)

    Click Here to Enter!
Cannabis Seeds

Celestial

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Jan 28, 2013
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www.autoflower.net
If you want to save money cloning... try out honey...It works pretty well...It's almost guaranteed to root...and it's cheap

I thought I'd post this for those you who are tired of paying 20-50 bucks for cloning gel.

Happy growing guys

p.s. It's not explosive root growth but it does help to produce roots
 
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lr2jd

Auto Warrior
Dec 15, 2012
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Honey does not produce roots. It supplies the plant with a little glucose to give it a start. There are near to no auxins in honey. It works as an antifungal agent as well as antibacterial. That's basically the most important thing for rooting cutlings; keep fungi away. I mix it with auxin powder, with mixed results. Eversince I just use plain nothing and some potting soil. Works just as well! Saves the $4 of honey! Saves more money!
 

lamsbread

Auto Warrior
Jan 27, 2013
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Over the years I have taken cutting of many different types plant using nothing more than water or free draining gritty compost and generally had no problems.
Using cloning powders,liquids and gel can certainly have beneficial effects especially with hard to clone strains of cannabis such as big bud.
So adding a bit of honey for antimicrobial and antifungal sound ok to me and also something i will have to try.
If you already like honey then a small amout poured in an egg cup will sufice for your clones and you get to enjoy the rest of your jar, so the expense will only be cents/pence.
Something you may wish to consider is new growth willow bark taken in the spring.
Here is something I have cut a nd pasted from - DeepGreenPermaculture.com -
“Willow Water” – How it Works

“Willow Water” is a homebrew plant rooting hormone that is easily made and can be used to increase the strike rate (growth of roots) of cuttings that you’re trying to propagate.
The way that it works can be attributed to two substances that can be found within the Salix (Willow) species, namely, indolebutyric acid (IBA) and Salicylic acid (SA).
Indolebutyric acid (IBA) is a plant hormone that stimulates root growth. It is present in high concentrations in the growing tips of willow branches. By using the actively growing parts of a willow branch, cutting them, and soaking them in water, you can get significant quantities of IBA to leach out into the water.
Salicylic acid (SA) (which is a chemical similar to the headache medicine Aspirin) is a plant hormone which is involved in signalling a plant’s defences, it is involved in the process of “systemic acquired resistance” (SAR) – where an attack on one part of the plant induces a resistance response to pathogens (triggers the plant’s internal defences) in other parts of the plant. It can also trigger a defence response in nearby plants by converting the salicylic acid into a volatile chemical form.
When you make willow water, both salicylic acid and IBA leach into the water, and both have a beneficial effect when used for the propagation of cuttings. One of the biggest threats to newly propagated cuttings is infection by bacteria and fungi. Salicylic acid helps plants to fight off infection, and can thus give cuttings a better chance of survival. Plants, when attacked by infectious agents, often do not produce salicylic acid quickly enough to defend themselves, so providing the acid in water can be particularly beneficial.
Willow water can be made from cuttings of any tree or shrub of the willow family, a group of plants with the scientific name of Salix. The more cuttings that are used and the longer they are soaked in water, the stronger will be the resulting willow water. Recommendations for the exact method of soaking vary. Cold water can be used, and soaking times of four or more weeks are often quoted. Other gardeners use boiling water to steep the willow twigs and soak the mixture for around 24 hours.



One last thing I will add is it is beste to use a sharp clean sterile knife, using scissors will crush some of the planrt cells causing them to die right at the point you want roots to appear. Dead cell are more likely to be places where infection take hold.

Just occured to me this is an Autoflower forum (mostly. I realise photo's are also grown) but the subject of cuttings is a photo subject, just made giggle is all ;)


How ever you take your cuttings please share your result with the rest of us so we can see how valid each method is, keeping a log and taking daily picture would also be a benefit, this way we can all learn together.


Peace


Growerz
 
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lamsbread

Auto Warrior
Jan 27, 2013
145
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Hi Diablow420
I think what Ir2jd is saying is the honey does not contain auxins.
Auxins are hormone which stimulate rooting in plants.
Honey does not contain these hormone so it does not as it were stimulate root growth, however the upper parts of plants such as the tips and ends of branches naturally contain these hormones and is where we take cuttings from.
The honey is benneficial because where we have taken the cutting is suseptable to infection from microbial and fungal infections, so the honey will help keep disease at bay.
So honey can deffinately play a role in promoting diseease free & healthy cuttings, which in turn will mean a greater chance of rooting success.

If you are interested in learning more about rooting hormones I have cut and pasted this from mmmfaq.com

Auxins are produced in significant quantities in the upper growth regions of plants, promoting cell elongation. It travels from the shoot tip to the base when the plant is actively growing. It plays a role in the formation of plant roots.
IAA is an auxin in it’s natural state. Synthetic rooting hormones contain compounds such as IBA typically ranging in concentrations from 1000-10,000 ppm. When cuttings are taken, and dipped for rooting, here’s part of what happens:
The plant stops growing stem tissue. The cells that have been developing but have not yet been dedicated to any specific type of growth (i.e. stem development) are stimulated by the auxin such as IBA to become roots. These cells are now set to grow roots, and will further multiply and develop to produce a healthy root system, which will develop hormones that influence the upper development of the plant. Synthetic auxins sprayed on tomato vines will allow fruit to develop without pollination. Auxin that is usually produced by the seeds has been replaced, so no seeds will develop.
An overdose of auxin will actually inhibit cell elongation, because the plant will produce another hormone to try and balance the act. When applied to seeds, auxins also help to promote femaleness in dioecious plants (plants having females and males). The concentration of auxin is usually highest at the main growing point of the plant, surpressing lateral/side shoot growth. Growers have often pinched the tips of the plants in order to promote extensive branching and to keep plants short and sturdy. Bending and tying the growing point downwards will also have a similar effect without damaging the concentration of auxins within the plant.

Read more: http://www.mmmfaq.com/marijuana-hormones/#ixzz2b7lkaPYp

keep us posted about past successes or future cuttings, Every day I learn something new is a good day & and everyday I learn nothing is a wasted day.

Peace

Growerz
 

CLMonkey

Auto Warrior
Apr 30, 2013
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Im gonna try the willow water sometime.. i wonder what adding a bit of this willow water to a feeding would do? anyone have any input?
:smokebuds:
 

CLMonkey

Auto Warrior
Apr 30, 2013
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we used to dip the fresh cuttings in honey to keep them viable longer, as we would do 50 - 60 at a time.. my boss preferred use of honey because he said water softened the cutting too much and the honey kept the germs out till we planted. as we popped them in the cubes, we just roughed up the outer layer, gave them a dip in clonex and plant. i would think honey would also give a little energy boost to the cuttings. But i think this subject is one of wide opinions, returning us to whatever works :)
:karma Cloud:
 

swampman

Organic Reptile Hunter
Jul 2, 2012
7,038
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I have had about 85% on Tomato cutting with honey. .
Without its even worst...
I think it does add an extra added value ...besides who and what plant doesn't enjoy sugars !!!