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The Weak Link and the Art of Training Yourself to be a better grower

Koi

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@912GreenSkell once again opening my eyes to the real goal at hand, improving your practice and focusing on the key aspects of your own developing style first and not to get frustrated easily. The art of growing really does require a special patience, but all of us growers know full well it is worth it when the end product finally meets a goal we have strived for
:headbang::smokeit:
 

Olde School Player

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The Weak Link and the Art of Training Yourself to be a better grower

The weak link? Training the grower to be a better grower? What is this? It's like this....

"Not for a free weed country or continent, but for a free weed world. Unite and grow, for a better, kinder planet"
912GreenSkell
Great article, GS, enjoyed the read thoroughly. And I agree wholeheartedly, even the most experienced growers on some days will sit and stare at a problem and the only thing that suggests itself is brain farts. It's absolutely useful to have a checklist like this to force yourself to check all the variables. I love the way Sherlock Holmes summed it up:
"Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth."

I found your article here while searching for answers to a problem I've never seen before. So I could use a few minutes of your time if you can drop by my latest posts at https://www.autoflower.net/forums/threads/effects-of-light-intensity-on-plant-growth.65115/page-19#post-1915672 description starts at post # 182.
My latest grow is an autoflower strain (Fast Buds' Rhino Ryder [Medicine man auto])[FONT=Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif] [/FONT]that won't flower. It does show preflowers - just a few & you have to search - but they are there. I grew this seedling under CFL for two weeks and it has been under COB lighting for 32 days, so 46 days from germination. I don't believe it is an accidental photoperiod strain that got mixed into an auto order, as this breeder only sells auto's. Sure, they need photoperiods to breed, but highly doubtful they would ever get their seed-for-sale products intermixed with breeding stock seed. Besides, most of that breeding working stock must be clones to create stability in the new strain.

So, in some past readings I've heard this called a "slow" auto, but I've never read the definitive science behind this. Today's autoflowers ARE hybrids, after all, and different phenotypes are going to be more prone to one parental than the other. But I'm having trouble thinking the ruderalis / autoflower gene is going to just turn on and turn off in response to reduced day-hours to encourage bloom. I HOPE it will, but I am stuck with the idea that "It either IS an autoflower, or it's NOT." Maybe I'm drawing the lines between traditional photoperiod plants, and hybrid autoflower plants, a little too boldly?
Your article above does hint at that with some reference to hybrids.

F6 stopped by & in one of his experiences, manipulation of the light cycle seemed to force bloom, and allow a return to longer day-hours while continuing bloom to maturity. That's what I'm hoping for, even if i don't understand it. But any other experiences would certainly be welcomed.
@bushmasterar15 , if you have the time to take a look as well, all comments / science welcomed.
 

Citizen_Scientist

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This is awesome. Lots of good stuff to read into here and I am only on the first page. Thank you
 
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