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Greenleaf Nutrients

Update Feeding Chart for AF?

Greenleaf Nutrients

Auto Warrior
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Jan 15, 2018
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greenleafnutrients.com
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I just mix chunks of mega crop I weigh five grams no problem little chunk balls or powder it seems to make no difference in my tents. I never even thought of the chunks being more concentrated.
yeah, that is kind of the intention of how people should use it (not think about it).
If you are a small scale growing mixing very small batches, possibly you want to either grind or mix a liquid concentrate to get a more "even" dose.

On our next reformulation of Mega Crop, we will make the pieces much smaller since it seems that a lot of people are concerned about this.
 

KonopCh

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Jul 8, 2016
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"I buy DynaGro 1 gallon at a time ($55) and to make this an apples-to-apples comparison I’ll be comparing DG’s 1 gallon to MegaCrop’s 2500g size @ $32.69 (includes shipping). They mix up a similar amount of reservoirs but the gallon of DG will last about 5 weeks longer.

So the first thing that I want to address is the inaccuracy printed on the bags of Megacrop. They claim that 4gs of their product into a gallon of water equals 1.2EC (840 ppm). I measured 4 different times out of 2 different MC bags with a freshly calibrated EC pen. The best I came up with is that 4gs of MegaCrop into a gallon of water equals 0.87EC (610 ppm) which means MegaCrop is over-stating their potency by nearly 38%. I also checked out MC's website some months ago and they had a lot of misleading information about the cost of comparable products on the market. For instance, they calculated their own cost of use at a feeding strength of 1.0 EC but when they calculated the cost of a competitor's product they did so at feeding levels sometimes well over 2.0 EC. That's shady as hell and it's the same thing AN used to pull when attacking their competitors in the market. That bit on their website has since been taken down but used to be here: (https://greenleafnutrients.com/product-comparison/?v=b457452c21b1).

In the defense of MegaCrop, and let me be clear here, they do lie on their bags, however, those recommendations are safe for your average idiot grower who doesn't own a ppm/EC pen and blindly follows the manufacturers recommendations. Even feeding at their high end of 6gs/gal, you're still safe. Compare that to many other feeding charts, DynaGro's included, and following them to a T will absolutely scorch your plants.

So let’s figure out the real cost of MC in my 18 gallon reservoir. I’ll be feeding at around 1.1 EC from start to finish which means MC (90g each week into the reservoir) is going to cost $10.59 for this 9 week flowering period. DynaGro at the same feeding level costs $15.12 (115mls each week into the reservoir). Now this is a difference of $4.53 over a 2 month period. Obviously the difference in price increases with the scale of the grow and at some level the price difference between the two products could outweigh the inconvenience of dealing with dusty dry foods that need pH-adjustments every few days. Yield would be a factor too. If MC is more of a pain to deal with but yields more then obviously that’s something to consider too. Generally speaking in my life, time is the most important commodity so naturally I’d always be leaning towards the liquid foods in any wet vs dry plant food comparison.

Full disclosure here: I do use a couple other additives along with DG. They're not necessary but they are beneficial and I believe these products are already included in the MC dry mix that I'm currently using. So with DG, the money that I'm not spending on pH-up and down could easily be negated by the couple additives that I use.

So it looks like Mega Crop did not take down the cost comparison that I saw on their site. It can be found here (https://greenleafnutrients.com/product/mega-crop/?v=7516fd43adaa#!/NPK).

So what rubs me the wrong way is that they are comparing their own cost of use at 4.1g servings which equals 633 ppm (0.9EC) to 10ml/gal servings with DynaGro which equals 1150ppm (1.64 EC). That's not an apple-to-apples comparison and when calculating cost at these very different feeding levels it becomes VERY misleading.

Let's looks at the Aqua Flakes Comparison too. I've used Aqua Flakes in the past and I actually really liked it. It's a 2-part food and you use equal parts from start to finish. Super easy! So MC is claiming that this is THE most expensive plant food option on their list. They're saying that 40L of Aqua Flakes only makes 587 gallons. That means that users are feeding their plants with a total of 68.1 mls/gal! If I recall the potency of Aqua Flakes correctly, that's a feeding level of 5451ppm (7.78 EC). I'm thinking someone forgot to carry a 1 or something? If shooting for 1.1 EC, Aqua Flakes users only need about 4.5mls/gal of each part. At that feeding rate, 40L of food makes 4444 gallons of food.

So as you can see MC is not doing apples-to-apples comparisons here which I think is shady and misleading. So far it looks like MC is a good product and they shouldn't be resorting to these lies to sell their plant foods."
 

woody

Choose not a life of imitation
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Jan 6, 2015
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"I buy DynaGro 1 gallon at a time ($55) and to make this an apples-to-apples comparison I’ll be comparing DG’s 1 gallon to MegaCrop’s 2500g size @ $32.69 (includes shipping). They mix up a similar amount of reservoirs but the gallon of DG will last about 5 weeks longer.

So the first thing that I want to address is the inaccuracy printed on the bags of Megacrop. They claim that 4gs of their product into a gallon of water equals 1.2EC (840 ppm). I measured 4 different times out of 2 different MC bags with a freshly calibrated EC pen. The best I came up with is that 4gs of MegaCrop into a gallon of water equals 0.87EC (610 ppm) which means MegaCrop is over-stating their potency by nearly 38%. I also checked out MC's website some months ago and they had a lot of misleading information about the cost of comparable products on the market. For instance, they calculated their own cost of use at a feeding strength of 1.0 EC but when they calculated the cost of a competitor's product they did so at feeding levels sometimes well over 2.0 EC. That's shady as hell and it's the same thing AN used to pull when attacking their competitors in the market. That bit on their website has since been taken down but used to be here: (https://greenleafnutrients.com/product-comparison/?v=b457452c21b1).

In the defense of MegaCrop, and let me be clear here, they do lie on their bags, however, those recommendations are safe for your average idiot grower who doesn't own a ppm/EC pen and blindly follows the manufacturers recommendations. Even feeding at their high end of 6gs/gal, you're still safe. Compare that to many other feeding charts, DynaGro's included, and following them to a T will absolutely scorch your plants.

So let’s figure out the real cost of MC in my 18 gallon reservoir. I’ll be feeding at around 1.1 EC from start to finish which means MC (90g each week into the reservoir) is going to cost $10.59 for this 9 week flowering period. DynaGro at the same feeding level costs $15.12 (115mls each week into the reservoir). Now this is a difference of $4.53 over a 2 month period. Obviously the difference in price increases with the scale of the grow and at some level the price difference between the two products could outweigh the inconvenience of dealing with dusty dry foods that need pH-adjustments every few days. Yield would be a factor too. If MC is more of a pain to deal with but yields more then obviously that’s something to consider too. Generally speaking in my life, time is the most important commodity so naturally I’d always be leaning towards the liquid foods in any wet vs dry plant food comparison.

Full disclosure here: I do use a couple other additives along with DG. They're not necessary but they are beneficial and I believe these products are already included in the MC dry mix that I'm currently using. So with DG, the money that I'm not spending on pH-up and down could easily be negated by the couple additives that I use.

So it looks like Mega Crop did not take down the cost comparison that I saw on their site. It can be found here (https://greenleafnutrients.com/product/mega-crop/?v=7516fd43adaa#!/NPK).

So what rubs me the wrong way is that they are comparing their own cost of use at 4.1g servings which equals 633 ppm (0.9EC) to 10ml/gal servings with DynaGro which equals 1150ppm (1.64 EC). That's not an apple-to-apples comparison and when calculating cost at these very different feeding levels it becomes VERY misleading.

Let's looks at the Aqua Flakes Comparison too. I've used Aqua Flakes in the past and I actually really liked it. It's a 2-part food and you use equal parts from start to finish. Super easy! So MC is claiming that this is THE most expensive plant food option on their list. They're saying that 40L of Aqua Flakes only makes 587 gallons. That means that users are feeding their plants with a total of 68.1 mls/gal! If I recall the potency of Aqua Flakes correctly, that's a feeding level of 5451ppm (7.78 EC). I'm thinking someone forgot to carry a 1 or something? If shooting for 1.1 EC, Aqua Flakes users only need about 4.5mls/gal of each part. At that feeding rate, 40L of food makes 4444 gallons of food.

So as you can see MC is not doing apples-to-apples comparisons here which I think is shady and misleading. So far it looks like MC is a good product and they shouldn't be resorting to these lies to sell their plant foods."
Many fair points im sure just wondering are you subtracting your base ppm/ec from all readings or maybr your using r/o water.

Comparing 1gallon to 2500g is hardly apples to apples though?
1 gallon weighs 3.785kg so your using over 33% more DG
That makes your comparison pointless imo.
 

Archaic

Flushing is a myth!
Oct 21, 2017
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I don't really worry about the solid bits and sediment, I just try to keep tds at around 500ppm above baseline and watch my plants.

Is MC perfect? Nope. Is MC the best nutrient money can buy? Nope.

Is MegaCrop ideal for a guy like me that fills an autopot reservoir and then goes on the road working for 10 days without worrying about what I find in my stealth grow when I get home? Yep, it has been so far. This stuff seems like it was almost made with the neglectful Autopot grower in mind.

I bought the 10 Kg bag of 1.0 last year and even after giving some away, I still have a five gallon bucket 2/3 full. Ive seen no reason so far why I would change gears.

My biggest complaint is that it's so hydroscopic, and even that's pretty much true for any dry fertilizer.
 

Archaic

Flushing is a myth!
Oct 21, 2017
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I think mc is just on the low side of good like said before it's good for lazy people like me you want something simple this is it
Yep, when I'm looking at something with Part A and Part B, then switch to Part C and then Part D - my eyes glaze over. I can't be bothered to do that with my tomatoes and squash, I'm probably not going to do it with weed either. I know some people do, and most of them are way better growers than me, but I generally don't try to over think things as much.
 

Simplicio

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Aug 19, 2017
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Yep, when I'm looking at something with Part A and Part B, then switch to Part C and then Part D - my eyes glaze over. I can't be bothered to do that with my tomatoes and squash, I'm probably not going to do it with weed either. I know some people do, and most of them are way better growers than me, but I generally don't try to over think things as much.
I disagree with your premise that those who use multi-part fertilizers are better growers than you.
On the contrary, your desire to avoid multi-part, and to use no harmful supplements makes you a better grower.
 
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